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15 Toronto Street, 8th Floor
Toronto, Ontario M5C 2E3


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Admin
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Post Number: 445
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Wednesday, December 01, 2004 - 01:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Instructor Training Course


We would like to take this oppotunity to let every one know that we are running the following course.

Course Instructor Training Course

When Friday, 6 - 10pm Saturday & Sunday 9am - 5pm January 7,8,9 & 21, 22, 23, 2005
Pre-evaluation Friday December 6,2004 6 - 10pm (or can be arranged at your convenience).

Where St John Ambulance
Woodstock/Oxford
587 Canterbury Street
Woodstock, On
N4S 4L1

Cost $350:00

Please call the office between 9am and 1pm when we will be able to assist you.

Judith A Gillatt
Marketing & Training Coordinator
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Post Number: 443
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Monday, November 29, 2004 - 03:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

New Provincial Youth Coordinator


TO: Branches and affiliated Community Services Units
FROM: Agnes Daniell, Vice-Chair, Community Services
RE: Provincial Youth Coordinator (senior volunteer)

I am pleased to announce the appointment of Mr. Doug Keith to the senior volunteer role of Provincial Youth Coordinator. As part of the Provincial Community Services Team he will be responsible for the development of the provincial youth leadership network and the co-ordination, support and facilitation of provincial youth-related community service initiatives.

Doug has an extensive background in youth development that includes related leadership experience with both the military and St. John Ambulance cadet movements. His most recent role within St. John was that of District Youth Officer.

I hope you will join me in welcoming Doug to his new volunteer role with St. John.
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Post Number: 434
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Wednesday, October 06, 2004 - 01:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

15Toronto

We�re on the Move!

For over a year we have been searching for a new location for our Provincial Office. After investigating at least fifty different potential facilities and making at least twenty site visits during the summer, a proposal was approved to lease office space, suitable to St. John needs. The lease includes additional space in the basement for our Stores and Print operations as well as historical archive and file storage.

15 Toronto Street (8th Floor) is located two blocks east of Yonge Street and one block north of King Street. It is an attractive looking building, currently being extensively updated by the owner. Conveniently located in the downtown core, it is close to the subway and other transportation facilities. (There is underground public parking directly across the street, and lot parking within a block of the building)

Our scheduled move-in date is Monday, November 1, and planning is underway. While it is business as usual for us over the next several months, we will obviously require your patience with us at a few key times during the transition phase.

October 25-29 This week will be devoted to cleaning, packing and labelling our offices for the big move. We will still be accessible by phone, but would ask that you understand that access to paperwork will, of necessity, be limited.
October 30-31 The Great Move
November 1 Move-in. Again, we will be accessible by phone, but access to paperwork will be limited.

In our efforts to inconvenience you as little as possible, we expect to retain our current telephone number and extensions, and while you may continue to place Stores orders during the week of October 25th, we ask your willingness to wait until mid-November (latest) for delivery of those orders. Council staff are prepared to work around our disruptions and to be up and running again at full power within a few days of our move. We are excited about our new facility, and look forward to working in an environment that will be more efficient and streamlined, which will, in turn, enable us to serve you better.

Council for Ontario
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Admin
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Post Number: 432
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Tuesday, October 05, 2004 - 09:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

2004 International Cadet First Aid Competition

Reminder Notice


The 2004 International Cadet First Aid Competition will be held at several locations throughout Ontario on Sunday October 24, 2004. The guidelines of the competition, including age criteria are detailed and available online, JUST THE FACTS - October 2003 and all information is posted at CadetsOnline.ca.

To facilitate planning and confirm locations, all completed entries must be received at Council no later than October15, 2004. The Intent To Enter form is also attached. Late entries will not be accepted. An Intent To Enter form is required for each team of 4 wishing to compete. These forms may be faxed, mailed or emailed to PHQ. Detailed joining instructions will be forwarded to divisions intending to enter.

To assist you in preparation of your teams, historical scenarios are available online or may be requested from the Community Services office at Council, Telephone 1-800-268-7581, on request. A complete archive of the last nine years of International Cadet First Aid Competition problem sets are available in PDF format online at Cadets Online http://CadetsOnline.ca.

This is an excellent opportunity to rally your division to prepare to compete in our Patient Care Competitions next spring and a great introduction for our youngest youth members as this competition has been designed for them and is aimed at Emergency First Aid and not BTS.

Sincerely,

Don Smith
Email: dsmith@on.sja.ca

Intent To Enter Form - PDF
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Post Number: 430
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Sunday, September 26, 2004 - 07:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Request for public duty assistance


From: Geoff Wybrew
Sent: September 26, 2004 5:23 AM
Subject: Assistance for the annual Simcoe Fair.

Hello everyone,

It's that time of year again. The Norfolk St John Community Services Division is asking for assistance to help cover this year's Fair. The Fair starts on Tuesday, October 5 and closes at the end of the day Monday, October 11. The Fair opens each day around 10:00 AM and closes around 11:00 PM.

We need coverage for each day throughout each day. Even the weekend needs coverage.

Weekdays are particularly hard to cover (most people are working at this time). If you have days off and can help, this would be great!! Any time that you have would be greatly appreciated (the more the merrier).

There are a number of well known entertainers throughout the week;
* Two demo derbies.
* Concert by Emerson Drive.
* Concert by Colin James.
* Tractor pull.
* Assorted horse shows.
* Etc.

Please reply ASAP with any assistance that you area able to provide. Thank you!!

Here is a link for any Fair info you wish to look at:
http://www.norfolkcountyfair.com/

Geoff
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Post Number: 428
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Saturday, September 18, 2004 - 08:09 am:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

News Flash.....

Friday November 5, 2004 - Queen�s Park - Our 2004 Grand Priors� and Levels of Distinction Ceremony will be hosted by our Lt. Governor of Ontario, The Honourable James K. Bartleman.

Further Details will be released as they become available. Recepients for this year's annual youth awards ceremony should be contacted by mail.
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Post Number: 427
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Friday, September 10, 2004 - 11:38 am:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)



Online Ontario Open First Aid Competition Registration Package - PDF Version
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Post Number: 424
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Wednesday, September 01, 2004 - 09:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Provincial Emergency Management Resources


Our online Blank Forms Registry has recently expanded its collection and now is a source of sample blackline master documents to assist regions with Emergency Management Preparedness.

Emergency Response Services Related Forms
Triage Tag Management Form - PDF
Triage Tag Management Form - XLS
Emergency Preparedness Kit Inventory Form - XLS
Emergency Preparedness Kit Inventory Form - PDF
Emergency Management Information Form - PDF
Emergency Management Information Form - XLS
Emergency Response Services' Forms (10 Masters) - PDF

Carmie McCormack
Provincial Emergency Management Coordinator
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Post Number: 420
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Tuesday, August 24, 2004 - 08:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Peterborough Shelter

Hello Everyone

Well, the time has come! The evacuation shelter we have been providing our services to since the "100 year flood" in July is closing. The doors will close tonight, Monday, August 23, 2004 at 23:00. All residents have found
housing or are being housed through Social Services.

Thank you to everyone who has contributed to our efforts. It has been a long haul over the past 32 days of manning the command post at the shelter. We could not have provided our community this service without the support of all who have helped out. Your support has been very valuable and most appreciated.

If you were scheduled for a future shift, I would appreciate if you could respond to this email so I know you are aware your services are no longer required at the shelter. This may save me a few phone calls. If I do not
hear from you in the next 24 hours, I will make the necessary phone calls to ensure all volunteers are aware of the change in situation. Please pass this information on to anyone you know has offered help to our efforts, that I may not have had contact information for.

Again, thank you to everyone who has contributed in any way to the success of our disaster relief efforts.

Susan P. Sweet
Divisional Superintendent
Peterborough D0053
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Post Number: 417
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 09:51 am:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Request for Assistance ~ CNE Toronto Event Coverage


TO: Branches and Community Services Units ~
Request for Assistance ~ CNE Toronto Event Coverage

This years Canadian National Exhibition (CNE) is rapidly approaching and we at the Toronto Administrative Centre will be looking for help. The CNE starts on August 20th, 2004 and goes to September 6th, 2004. Shifts can run from 0930 to 0000 and can be broken up to accommodate staffing.

We are looking for both BTS level 1 and level 2 Patient Care Providers. Community Service members are asked to provide their certificates (note: members from Southern District will be asked to provide their MFR (AMFR1 - 40-hour) certification or their BTS). If your cert. is not available at the start of the CNE a signed letter of introduction from your immediate supervisor e.g. Superintendent can be presented in replacement. It will be kept on record for the duration of the CNE. There will also be an opportunity for Cadets to assist with this duty, the number of cadets will be determined by the number of Patient Care providers assigned to each shift.

We will be providing coverage in the form of foot patrols, static posts and response carts. Members working at this year�s CNE will be working closely with Toronto EMS to provide coverage. Assignments will be based on availability, current certification and fair distribution of workload based on availability of staffing. This is an opportunity to work with members from across Ontario. Extra help would be appreciated for warrior�s day.

More details will be forthcoming once information is updated. Summer Patient Care Provider dress or Campus response team uniform (if applicable) is expected. Uniform shirts or tactical pants/shorts are acceptable; all members are expected to wear their hats on duty.

Please inform duty officer of any special needs and language skills. We frequently have visitors from other countries as well as hearing impaired people who need extra assistance. This ability has improved service to the public and EMS in the past.

Please contact Daniel Whitworth with your availability by e-mail (preferred) dwhitworth@on.sja.ca or leave a message at (416) 967-4244 extension 288. A secondary contact is Ann-Pauline Lechadores by e-mail alechadores@on.sja.ca or by phone at (416) 967-4244 ext 503. Please e-mail both contacts to facilitate better service.

Thank you in advance,
Daniel Whitworth, Duty Manager
CNE 2004
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Post Number: 413
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Wednesday, July 14, 2004 - 09:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

KOTO' 2004

Knowledge Of the Order Camp


It is almost time to go back in time and learn the history of St. John. Join us at Camp KOTO'04 and learn our beginnings.

Being held in Collingwood, Ontario, last minute information is available online. The application deadline can only be extended for one additional week. Applications are due by July 21st.


On July 30 � August 02, 2004 there will be a Knowledge of the Order course held at Bygone Days Heritage Village in Collingwood. The Collingwood Quad Division will host this camp. You will have the opportunity to earn your Knowledge of the Order proficiency at this camp, though attendance at this camp does not necessarily qualify you for this proficiency. You must have completed all necessary pre-course activities and pass an evaluation process towards the end of this camp. If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact Karen Howell (705-466-5609).

The cost for the weekend will be $40 per person and a cheque payable to Karen Howell is needed when you send in your forms to complete the registration process. Registration forms are due by July 21st, 2004. Because of the intensity of this proficiency, there is an age limit of 15 and/or a minimum of 5 proficiencies already earned. There is a limit of 20 campers, so the registration will be based on first paid, first enrolled.

Please indicate any food allergies, special dietary requirements or any other relevant information that the leaders should know about on your medical form.

Campers will be sleeping outdoors, so please bring appropriate equipment (see attached kit list). The majority of activities WILL be outdoors, so please dress appropriately. All campers will be responsible for their own belongings.

Cadets will need to download the �Student�s Workbook� from www.cadetsonline.ca before the course. Go to Resources, then Online Resources � Youth Related, then Cadet Proficiency Subject Program Resources. You will find the Knowledge of the Order there. Please bring the workbook with you.

Karen Howell
Divisional Superintendent
Collingwood Quad
(705) 466-5609

Bygone Days Heritage Village
879 6th Street
Collingwood, ON L9Y 3Y9
(705) 445-4316
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Post Number: 395
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Wednesday, May 05, 2004 - 03:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Ontario Patient Care Competition Results


From: Brian Cole
Sent: March 11, 2004 11:12 AM
To: SJA Branches in Ontario (Email); Community Services Committee (Email)
Subject: Ontario Patient Care Competition Results ~ for information sharing

St. John Ambulance - Ontario Community Services Patient Care Competition Results - Sunday, March 7, 2004

The following are the final results of the Ontario Community Services Patient Care Competitions.

Junior:

1st #557 Midland-Penetanguishene - Central District
2nd #333 - Toronto District
3rd #Y1009 St. Marys - South West District


Intermediate:

1st Northern District
2nd #333 - Toronto District
3rd Belleville Y0150 - Eastern District


Senior:

1st Ajax D0505 - Eastern District
2nd Varsity 726 - Toronto District
3rd Oakville Y0570 - Central West District

The 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place in each category have qualified to enter the Ontario Open First Aid Competition this fall in Toronto. Please note that the winning (qualifying) teams must register for the Ontario Open First Aid Competition ~ registration kits will be available in June from Wendy Wall (email: wwall@on.sja.ca)

Furthermore, based on the results, the following championship teams will also move on to the International Patient Care Competitions that are being held in British Columbia in May 2004:

Junior: #557 Midland-Penetanguishene - Central District

Senior: Ajax D0505 - Eastern District

Please note that there is no intermediate category at the National/International level.

Based on the results of the February Advanced Patient Care Competition, Oakville D0325 has qualified to submit a team to represent Ontario at the International Patient Care Competitions - Advanced (Open) category in BC.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank all the teams, coaches, and volunteers, especially District volunteers for their participation. I would also like to thank all the Provincial Community Services Staff that attended each of the venues.

Paul Sims
Provincial Training Officer
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Post Number: 389
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Wednesday, March 24, 2004 - 03:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

International First Aid Competitions for Cadets 2003

From: Joanna Mulvihill, NHQ
Sent: March 24, 2004 1:53 PM

I am pleased to announce the results of the International First Aid Competition for Cadets 2003. Congratulations to the British Columbia Team 751C Cadet Division who were the overall winner for the second year in a row.

Congratulations to all divisions from across Canada who participated. A special thank you to Samantha Smith (District Youth Officer - Toronto, Ontario) for setting the 2003 Individual Test Papers.

Following are the International and Canadian results:

International
CountryTeam NameScoreOverall Position
Canada 751C British Columbia Cadet Division372 1st
New Zealand Papakura Central 1 305 2nd
Essex (England) Colchester 251 3rd
South Africa Durban Cadet Division 250 4th
Kenya Pangani Girls Secondary School 223 5th
Merseyside (England) Bebington (Emma) 211 6th


Priory of Canada
Team/Council Score Overall Position
751c Team A/British Columbia 372 1
776c Team A/British Columbia 371 2
389c Team Ducks/British Columbia 359 3
776c Team B/British Columbia 343 4
1004 New Tech Cadet Division/Ontario 315 5
751c Team B/British Columbia 308 6
557 Midland Penetanguishene Quad Division - Team #2/Ontario 297 7
557 Midland Penetanguishene Quad Division - Team #1/Ontario 296 8
406 Burlington Cadet Division - Team #1/Ontario 294 9
1037 Agincourt Cadet Division - Team #1/Ontario291 10
1041C Federal District 260 11
315C Federal District 240 12
389c Team Hobo/British Columbia 239 13


Congratulations to all!!

Joanna Mulvihill
Community Services Program Coordinator
St. John Ambulance
1900 City Park Drive, Suite 400
Ottawa, Ontario K1J 1A3
Tel: (613) 236-1283 Ext. 251
Fax: (613) 236-2425
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Post Number: 388
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Posted on Wednesday, March 24, 2004 - 03:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

International First Aid Competitions for Cadets 2003

From: Joanna Mulvihill, NHQ
Sent: March 24, 2004 1:53 PM

I am pleased to announce the results of the International First Aid Competition for Cadets 2003. Congratulations to the British Columbia Team 751C Cadet Division who were the overall winner for the second year in a row.

Congratulations to all divisions from across Canada who participated. A special thank you to Samantha Smith (District Youth Officer - Toronto, Ontario) for setting the 2003 Individual Test Papers.

Following are the International and Canadian results:

International
CountryTeam NameScoreOverall Position
Canada 751C British Columbia Cadet Division372 1st
New Zealand Papakura Central 1 305 2nd
Essex (England) Colchester 251 3rd
South Africa Durban Cadet Division 250 4th
Kenya Pangani Girls Secondary School 223 5th
Merseyside (England) Bebington (Emma) 211 6th


Priory of Canada
Team/Council Score Overall Position
751c Team A/British Columbia 372 1
776c Team A/British Columbia 371 2
389c Team Ducks/British Columbia 359 3
776c Team B/British Columbia 343 4
1004 New Tech Cadet Division/Ontario 315 5
751c Team B/British Columbia 308 6
557 Midland Penetanguishene Quad Division - Team #2/Ontario 297 7
557 Midland Penetanguishene Quad Division - Team #1/Ontario 296 8
406 Burlington Cadet Division - Team #1/Ontario 294 9
1037 Agincourt Cadet Division - Team #1/Ontario291 10
1041C Federal District 260 11
315C Federal District 240 12
389c Team Hobo/British Columbia 239 13


Congratulations to all!!

Joanna Mulvihill
Community Services Program Coordinator
St. John Ambulance
1900 City Park Drive, Suite 400
Ottawa, Ontario K1J 1A3
Tel: (613) 236-1283 Ext. 251
Fax: (613) 236-2425
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Admin
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Post Number: 374
Registered: 10-2002
Posted on Thursday, January 29, 2004 - 12:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)



St. John Ambulance is committed to protecting your personal information that you share with us. We value your trust. The personal information you share with us can only be used or disclosed for the purpose for which it was collected unless you have consented or it is required or permitted by law.

Please read the St. John Ambulance Privacy Policy as it relates to the StJohnOnline & CadetsOnline websites entitled "Our Privacy Policy and Legal Information".

By choosing to continue to maintain your personal information on these websites you acknowledge that you have read and understand the above
statement of information in its entirety and do hereby approve the release of your personal information entered on these sites for its use online in your postings, your profile and for system notification purposes.
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Post Number: 372
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Posted on Wednesday, January 28, 2004 - 03:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Fact Sheet: Pandemic Influenza and Pandemic Influenza Planning
Health Canada FACT SHEET - PDF

What is an influenza pandemic?
People are exposed to different strains of the influenza virus many times during their lives. Even though the virus changes, their previous bouts of influenza may offer some protection against infection caused by a similar strain of the virus. However, three to four times each century, for unknown reasons, a radical change takes place in the influenza A virus causing a new strain to emerge. Since people have no protection against the new strain, it can spread rapidly around the world, causing what is known as a pandemic. Frequently, the pandemic influenza virus causes severe complications, such as pneumonia and death in previously healthy individuals. The last three pandemics occurred in 1918-19, 1957-58 and 1968-69. Pandemics are unpredictable, but most experts agree that another is likely to occur in the next five to 10 years.

What is the Government of Canada doing to protect us against the next pandemic?
In collaboration with the provinces and territories, the Government of Canada has developed a Canadian Pandemic Influenza Plan that maps out how Canada will prepare for and respond to a pandemic influenza outbreak. The plan creates a framework that guides the actions of all levels of government in the event of an influenza pandemic. It includes an emergency response plan, as well as guidelines and checklists designed to assist all jurisdictions with their emergency planning.

Why do we need a Canadian Influenza Pandemic Plan?
The plan is a national one outlining the roles and responsibilities of all levels of government so that we have a consistent response that protects the health of all Canadians in the event of a pandemic. Each jurisdiction will use this plan as a framework when developing their own plans.

Planning for a pandemic requires a high level of coordination among all levels of government. The plan is essential for clarifying roles and responsibilities of all those involved in emergency response, governments, public health officials and health care workers, in the event of a pandemic.

What are the facts on Anti-Virals and Vaccines?
It is not feasible to stockpile a flu vaccine for a pandemic outbreak of influenza. In a pandemic, the flu virus is one that has changed radically. Manufacturing can�t begin until the new virus has emerged and the vaccine strain is available.

Even with the best science available to us, it will take at least four to six months for manufacturers to make a new vaccine once we have obtained the new virus. Health Canada has taken steps to be able to ramp up production once the virus is available. In this event, production of influenza vaccine by a domestic manufacturer, Shire Biologics of Saint-Foy, Que., can start immediately and production capacity can be increased. The goal is to produce enough vaccine to protect all Canadians as quickly as possible. Canada is the first country worldwide to plan for a secure vaccine supply through the contracting of a domestic supplier. The contract ensures that everything required for vaccine production, including the egg supply and storage facilities, is in place.

Canada�s Pandemic Plan also suggests the best and most effective ways to use anti-virals.

What�s the difference between the vaccine and the antivirals?
Vaccines cause the production of antibodies against the flu virus prior to being infected through exposure to a sick person. When an immunized person is exposed to a person with influenza the antibodies generated in response to the vaccine are ready to attack the virus as it enters the body and prevent illness.

Antiviral drugs work by reducing the ability of the virus to replicate, once a person is already infected. By taking these drugs early, within the first 48 hours of getting sick, they will lessen the length of the sickness and reduce the potentially serious complications of influenza.

Who develops the Pandemic Influenza Plan?
The members of the Pandemic Influenza Committee have developed the plan. The plan continues to evolve. Members of this committee include provincial and territorial surveillance and pandemic influenza planners and coordinators, as well as Health Canada officials and expert working groups. All provinces and territories currently have a copy of the Pandemic Influenza Plan and are using it for their own provincial and territorial planning. The plan is reviewed and approved by the Conference of Deputy Ministers.

How was the plan developed?
The plan is based on the basic principles of public health and emergency response. Canada has had a pandemic influenza plan since 1988 and the plan continues to evolve based on our research, our experience and the experiences of other countries with disease outbreaks. It was developed collaboratively through the Pandemic Influenza Committee and in consultation with over 200 experts.

What kind of activities does the plan cover?
The goals of influenza pandemic preparedness and response are to minimize serious illness and overall deaths, as well as to minimize any social disruption among Canadians as a result of an influenza pandemic. These will only be realized through the co-ordinated efforts of all orders of government in planning and preparation.

The plan covers the following activities:
� Prevention activities, such as annual immunization programs and the establishment of an infrastructure for manufacturing sufficient vaccines to protect all Canadians at the time of a pandemic.
� Preparedness activities, including simulation exercises, guidelines for informing the public and recommended training for emergency response and health care workers.
� Response/Implementation activities for controlling the pandemic, minimizing deaths and any social disruption it causes, including communications activities. Implementation also involves documenting the current activities and outcomes to determine if any changes need to be made to the response.
� Recovery activities, such as the dismantling of any emergency response centres setup to respond to the pandemic and the introduction of any new services, that might be required as a result of the pandemic.

What can you do to protect yourself and your family?
Prevention is the best defence against influenza. Canadians should protect themselves and each other by:

- Getting a flu shot;
- Washing their hands frequently; and
- Staying home if they are sick.

Since the SARS outbreak in March 2003, Health Canada, in consultation with P/T public health officials and other national and international experts, has taken steps in the following areas to strengthen its capacity to respond to future infectious disease outbreaks:

a. disease surveillance;
b. infection control
c. laboratories;
d. partnering and collaboration; and
e. emergency preparedness.

For example, Health Canada is providing specific guidelines on overall public health management of cases of SARS and other severe respiratory illness where investigation or follow-up in the community is required.

Health Canada Surveillance
Health Canada is also responsible for surveillance and response to infectious diseases that have a national impact, population health and vaccine regulation.

Health Canada�s Division of Immunization and Respiratory Diseases is responsible for national surveillance of respiratory pathogens that cause disease, investigation of outbreaks, supporting the National Advisory Committee on Immunization in the provision of guidelines for influenza immunization and collaboration with health policy makers.

This division distributes FluWatch. FluWatch is a weekly or bi-weekly report that summarizes influenza surveillance activities in Canada. Weekly reports are produced during the influenza season (October-May) and biweekly reports during the off-season (June-September).

Also, Health Canada�s National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg, Man., plays a key role in influenza surveillance, working with a network of laboratories across the country to identify and characterize strains of influenza. This network is able to determine the most prominent strains circulating in the Canadian population by testing clinical samples (like throat or nasal swabs) from patients with influenza-like illness from across Canada and throughout the year.

All this information guides the development of an immunization strategy for the annual influenza season. The National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) advises Health Canada on this strategy.

Health Canada FACT SHEET - PDF
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Post Number: 371
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Posted on Wednesday, January 28, 2004 - 03:34 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Fact Sheet: Avian Influenza
Health Canada FACT SHEET - PDF


What is avian influenza?
Avian influenza is a contagious viral infection that can affect all species of birds (chickens, turkeys, guinea fowl, pet birds and wild birds). In intensive poultry rearing systems, young fattening turkeys and laying hens are usually the most affected species.

Wild birds may carry influenza viruses without becoming ill due to natural resistance. Wild waterfowl present a natural reservoir for these viruses and can be responsible for the primary introduction of infection into domestic poultry. Signs of the disease range from a mild infection with no symptoms to a severe epidemic that kills up to 100 percent of infected birds.

Several virus types exist -- the strain that causes the greatest number of deaths is called highly pathogenic avian influenza. Low pathogenic strains of avian influenza have the potential to rapidly become highly pathogenic and some countries have adopted an eradication policy for low pathogenic strains of avian influenza due to that risk.

How is the disease transmitted?
Infection most commonly results from:
� contact with wild birds, especially waterfowl which may transmit the disease yet show no symptoms;
� contact with infected poultry and poultry products;
� contaminated clothing and footwear;
� contaminated vehicles and equipment;
� contaminated feed and water;
� high concentrations of virus in manure and litter;
� insects can act as carriers of the disease;
� rodents or farm dogs and cats which may act as mechanical vectors.

Does avian influenza occur in Canada?
Highly pathogenic avian influenza was isolated in Ontario in 1966, the only occurrence for Canada.. Low pathogenic avian influenza has been isolated in Canada three times since 1975.

What is being done to prevent its introduction?
The Canadian Food Inspection Agency imposes strict regulations on our imports of poultry and poultry products from foreign countries. At ports of entry, poultry vehicles and equipment may be inspected and disinfected if needed to ensure that they are free from the disease.

Should an outbreak of the disease occur, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency has developed an emergency response strategy which includes a stamping out policy. To limit the spread of the disease, a "control area" would be declared to contain all infected flocks. Producers would receive compensation for infected flocks ordered destroyed. Movement of poultry, poultry products, people and vehicles on or off infected farms would be restricted. Poultry and eggs at local markets would be tested for the presence of antibodies.

Avian influenza is divided into subgroups of viruses which change their genetic make-up readily. New types of viruses are often generated from two or more existing strains. Because of this continuous change, it is less feasible to produce vaccines in advance of a disease outbreak.

What can travellers do to avoid bringing the disease into the country?
Through its Travel Medicine Program, Health Canada is providing regular updates and travel guidance to Canadians at home and abroad. For information on the most up to date advice, please visit www.TravelHealth.gc.ca.

Travellers from abroad may carry the disease on their clothing including footwear and in poultry products. When travelling:
� Declare all poultry products you wish to bring into Canada;
� If you visit a farm while abroad, make sure that clothing and footwear you wear on the farm are free from soil and manure before entering Canada. Launder clothing, clean and disinfect footwear after arrival;
� Don�t visit areas where highly pathogenic avian influenza is known to occur.
� What can livestock producers do to prevent infection on their farm?

The reservoir of infection is in the wild bird populations. It is essential for commercial poultry producers to maintain strict biosecurity to reduce the chances of introduction. On a farm:
� Keep away from areas frequented by wild fowl;
� Keep strict control over access to your poultry houses by people and equipment;
� Ensure that reusable equipment is cleaned and disinfected before you take it into poultry houses;
� Discourage wild birds from visiting your farm; do not have bird feeders and duck ponds;
� Maintain high sanitation standards.

If symptoms are noticed or suspected in poultry, contact your veterinarian or the Canadian Food Inspection Agency in your area. Producers are obligated to report this disease under the Health of Animals Act in order to protect Canada�s poultry industry.

Is avian influenza transmissible to humans?
Influenza viruses of avian origin may on rare occasions cause disease in humans. The exact mode of transmission from birds to humans is not known. Human to human transmission of avian influenza is thought to be extremely limited.

Health Canada Website link: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/pphb-dgspsp/fluwatch/index.html

How did the current outbreak spread to humans?
There is currently no evidence of human-to-human transmission. The current H5N1 strain has been partially sequenced and all of its genes are avian in origin, suggesting that the virus has not acquired any human genes. The acquisition of human genes increases the likelihood that a virus of avian origin can be readily transmitted from one human to another. WHO investigations are currently focussing on the source of infection.

Avian influenza viruses do not normally infect species other than birds and pigs. Here are some examples of previous outbreaks. The first documented infection of humans with an avian influenza virus occurred in Hong Kong in 1997, when the H5N1 strain caused severe respiratory disease in 18 humans, leading to 6 deaths. The infection of humans coincided with an epidemic of highly pathogenic avian influenza, caused by the same strain, in Hong Kong�s poultry population.

Extensive investigation of that outbreak determined that close contact with live infected poultry was the source of human infection. Studies further determined that the virus had jumped directly from birds to humans. This was the first time that an avian influenza virus was transmitted directly to humans. A second outbreak of H5N1 avian influenza in Hong Kong in February 2003 caused 2 cases and 1 death.

How can bird flu cause a pandemic?
Avian flu outbreaks in birds increase opportunities for human exposure. Increases in the number of infections in humans increase opportunities for the avian and human strains to exchange genetic material. If a new virus subtype emerges as a result of this �mixing,� and if that virus proves capable of spreading easily and sustainably from person to person, then the outbreak of avian flu has created the conditions for the start of an influenza pandemic.

What is antigenic shift?
Flu viruses are constantly changing and evolving, which is why Health Canada continually monitors both the domestic and global flu situation. Influenza A viruses in particular can change radically. The virus, including subtypes from different species like the bird flu, can swap genetic materials and merge. This process is known as antigenic shift and creates a new flu virus different from both its parent viruses.

Since the virus is completely new, we have no immunity to it and existing vaccines cannot protect us against it. For this to happen, the new flu virus needs to have genes from human influenza viruses that make it readily transmissible from person to person for a sustainable period.

Conditions that favour the emergence of antigenic shift have long been thought to involve humans living in close proximity to domestic poultry and pigs. Because pigs are susceptible to infection with both avian and mammalian viruses, including human strains, they can serve as a �mixing vessel� for the scrambling of genetic material from human and avian viruses, resulting in the emergence of a new subtype against which the population has no immunity.

What can be done to stop the spread of avian influenza?
The WHO has alerted countries about the need to intensify surveillance for animal infections. Culling of infected or potentially exposed poultry flocks is a standard control measure and has been effective in stopping past epidemics of avian influenza in several countries.

Vaccination of persons at high risk of exposure to infected poultry, using existing vaccines effective against currently circulating human influenza strains, can reduce the likelihood of co-infection with human and avian influenza strains, reducing the risk that genes will be exchanged.

What about a vaccine? Aren�t flu vaccines made in eggs? How can you make the vaccine if birds are infected with the disease?
It is not feasible to stockpile a flu vaccine for a pandemic outbreak of influenza. In a pandemic, the flu virus is one that has changed radically. Manufacturing can�t begin until the new virus has emerged and the vaccine strain is available.

Even with the best science available to us, it will take at least four to six months for manufacturers to make a new vaccine once we have obtained the new virus. Health Canada has taken steps to be able to ramp up production once the virus is available. In this event, production of influenza vaccine by a domestic manufacturer, Shire Biologics of Saint-Foy, Que., can start immediately and production capacity can be increased. The goal is to produce enough vaccine to protect all Canadians as quickly as possible. Canada is the first country worldwide to plan for a secure vaccine supply through the contracting of a domestic supplier. The contract ensures that everything required for vaccine production, including the egg supply and storage facilities, is in place.

During the 2003 outbreak of avian influenza in Hong Kong, the WHO network took approximately 17 days to develop the new H5N1 vaccine that could grown in eggs by using a new technique called reverse genetics. WHO is comparing this H5N1 vaccine to the H5N1 virus isolated from the current outbreaks to determine if this vaccine would be effective against the current strain or if a new one would need to be developed. Based on last year�s experience, it is possible a new vaccine that would grow in eggs could be made available to manufacturers within the same time frame. After a new vaccine strain is identified, there are still many steps that has to be taken in the manufacturing, testing and licensing processes before a safe vaccine can be administered.

As a precautionary measure, the WHO is moving forward with the procedures needed to rapidly produce a new influenza vaccine capable of protecting humans against the H5N1 strain of avian influenza. Prototype viruses for vaccine production are being prepared by laboratories in the WHO Global Influenza Network. Several laboratories in this network have the high-security (biosafety level 3) facilities needed to safely conduct work on a highly pathogenic virus such as H5N1. Prototype viruses are then supplied to manufacturers as the �seed stock� for vaccine production.

Does Canada have a biosafety level 3 facility?
Yes. Canada has a number of biosafety level 3 facilities and a level 4 facility at the National Microbiology Lab in Winnipeg.

What is reverse genetics?
Reverse genetics merges selected genetic information of the virus taken from actual cases with a laboratory virus. The resulting virus is recognized by the human immune system, and causes a protective immune response, but no disease. The virus can also be genetically modified so that it is no longer lethal to chicken embryos. As a further advantage, use of the reverse genetics technique produces a prototype virus with predictable growth during vaccine production.

Is it safe to eat poultry?
Yes, it is safe to eat poultry. As a precaution and until further information is available, however, Health Canada is advising travellers to Vietnam, South Korea, Japan and Thailand that they should not consume undercooked poultry, raw eggs or lightly cooked egg products (such as runny eggs) and that they avoid unnecessary contact with live poultry. This includes markets where live birds are sold, as it is possible for the avian influenza virus to stick to hair and clothing and may be inhaled.

Eating poultry in Canada is perfectly safe. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has import restrictions in place on poultry and non-processed poultry products from any of the affected countries due to existing disease concerns. These countries are all considered to be high-risk for exotic Newcastle disease, another serious viral disease that will affect poultry. There are no known cases or outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in Canadian poultry. Canada has never reported a single case of HPAI.

The CFIA continues to monitor the outbreak situation in Asia, and will maintain the existing import restrictions until any of the affected countries are deemed free with respect to the spread of all avian diseases of concern.

Canada also has in place import restrictions for swine from the same countries because these countries are not recognized by the CFIA as countries free of serious swine diseases.

What can you do to protect yourself and your family?
It is important to remember that there is no evidence of human to human transmission of Avian Influenza.

For influenza in general, prevention is the best defence. Canadians should protect themselves and each other by:

- Getting a flu shot;
- Washing their hands frequently; and
- Staying home if they are sick.

Since the SARS outbreak in March 2003, Health Canada, in consultation with P/T public health officials and other national and international experts, has taken steps in the following areas to strengthen its capacity to respond to future infectious disease outbreaks:

� disease surveillance;
� infection control
� laboratories;
� partnering and collaboration; and
� emergency preparedness.

For example, Health Canada is providing specific guidelines on overall public health management of cases of SARS and other severe respiratory illness where investigation or follow-up in the community is required.

Health Canada FACT SHEET - PDF
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Posted on Sunday, January 25, 2004 - 09:09 am:   Edit Post Delete Post Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

2003 INTERNATIONAL FIRST AID COMPETITION FOR CADETS


While Canada still awaits word from England for our official International Standings, we are able to share with you our standings within our own Country. Congratulations to all! Our top 10 teams include:

Canadian Results


Team/CouncilOverall Position
751c Team A/British Columbia1
776c Team A/British Columbia2
389c Team Ducks/British Columbia3
776c Team B/British Columbia4
1004 New Tech Cadet Division/Ontario5
751c Team B/British Columbia6
557 Midland Penetanguishene Quad Division � Team #2/Ontario7
557 Midland Penetanguishene Quad Division � Team #1/Ontario8
406 Burlington Cadet Division � Team #1/Ontario9
1037 Agincourt Cadet Division � Team #1/Ontario10

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Eastern District Meeting and Volunteer Management Development


To: Eastern District Leadership, Branches and Community Services Units
From: Agnes Daniell, Provincial Commissioner
Date: January 2004
Subject: Eastern District Meeting and Volunteer Management Development

Council will be conducting a Volunteer Management Development � 1 Course in Eastern District that will be open to all volunteers and staff.

At that time we will also incorporate an Eastern District Community Services Meeting for Superintendents, Coordinators and Eastern District Community Services leadership. Both these activities will take place on the weekend of April 3 and 4, 2004 in Brockville, Ontario (specific venue to be announced).

Details will soon follow with regard to both the course and the meeting. I would encourage everyone to please keep this weekend free and I would like to see every Community Services Unit send their leadership (or at least a representative of your Unit).

Thank you, and I look forward to meeting many of you at that time.

A. Daniell
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Don't let frost bite you

With much of the country in the deep freeze St. John Ambulance, Canada��s leader in safety-oriented�� first aid training and high quality products, suggests keeping covered and active outdoors as your best protection against frostbite.

Frostbite is the result of skin being exposed to direct cold long enough for the tissue to freeze. In severe weather, uncovered skin, such as the face, ears or fingers, can freeze in a short period of time. Even protected body parts can suffer frostbite from longer periods of exposure to cold.

Should you or someone you��re with suffer exposure to cold, here��s what to look for and how to apply first aid for frostbite.

Frostbite�Xsigns and symptoms
There are two stages of frostbite�Xsuperficial and deep. At the superficial level, frostbite is often referred to as frostnip. In the initial stage of this progressive injury, the full thickness of skin becomes frozen. The skin will appear white, waxy and firm to the touch. Underneath, the tissue is still soft. There may be a mild sense of numbness or pain. Gently warming the exposed area and protecting it against further exposure can remedy this early stage.

The second stage�Xdeep frostbite�Xis when skin and the tissue under it becomes frozen, sometimes bone deep. This is a serious condition that requires immediate first aid. Skin will appear waxy and will eventually turn grayish-blue as frostbite progresses. The casualty will lose feeling in the affected area.

First aid for frostbite
1. Find shelter or protection from the cold.
2. Gradually re-warm the affected area by applying body heat. Cover frostbitten toes, ears etc. with warm hands.
3. Warm up frostbitten fingers by breathing on them or placing them in a warm area of the body, such as the armpit or groin.
4. Deep frostbite requires medical help as soon as possible. In the meantime, try to keep the casualty as still as possible. Do not rub the arms or legs.
5. If feet or legs are frozen, do not let the casualty walk.
6. If medical help is not available, transport the casualty to a warm place. Gently remove clothing to expose the frozen part.
7. Find a container large enough to immerse the frozen part.
8. Heat water to warm (about 40�aC) and gently submerge the frozen part. Keep replenishing water as soon as it begins to cool.
9. Though the casualty may complain of pain, keep the frozen area immersed until the skin becomes pink or does not improve further.
10. Gently dry the affected area, being careful not to break any blisters which may have formed.
11. Keep the affected part elevated and warm.
12. Get medical help as soon as possible.

Knowing what to do in an emergency can mean the difference of life or death. St. John Ambulance has state-of-the-art training and products designed to give you what you need to make a difference. For more on what St. John has to offer, contact the branch nearest you or check out our website, www.sja.ca.

St. John Ambulance - First in first aid, for you!
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Hypothermia�The Real Big Chill

With much of the country in the Deep Freeze, St. John Ambulance, Canada�s leader in safety-oriented first aid training and high quality products, suggests you protect against Hypothermia.

When a winter wind cuts through your clothing, you can rapidly lose body heat�essential to maintaining life. If your body temperature drops more than two degrees below its 37C core temperature, you can suffer hypothermia. This is a critical condition that can be fatal if not corrected.

Wet and wind are often the cause of hypothermia. St. John Ambulance, Canada�s trusted leader in first aid training and products, offers simple solutions to prevent this condition.

How the body loses heat and how to prevent it
� Radiation: Heat radiates from your body into the air. Wearing a hat can prevent heat loss from the head.
� Breathing: In chilly weather, you lose body heat by breathing cold air and exhaling air warmed by your body. Wearing a tunnel hood or ski tube in extreme cold will help to warm the air you breathe.
� Evaporation: Body heat is used to evaporate liquid on the skin. Keep dry in cold weather to prevent heat loss.
� Conduction: Heat is transferred from the body to cold objects we touch. Sitting on cold ground or wearing wet clothing can cause significant, rapid heat loss. Wear fabric next to your skin that moves the wet away, such as polypropylene.
� Convection: When wind blows through openings in clothing, it removes the thin layer of warm air around the body, which the body must now heat. Wear windproof clothing with snug collars and cuffs to keep wind out.

Hypothermia can stop you cold
Make no mistake�hypothermia is a dangerous condition. It�s important to know the symptoms and what to do.

Recognizing hypothermia as soon as possible is imperative to recovery. Though it may seem obvious on a cold day, the condition can also occur in warmer weather, especially if water and wind are factors. For many people, shivering is the first early sign of pending hypothermia. When this happens, be sure to prevent further heat loss immediately.

Hypothermia can inhibit the ability to think clearly, causing an individual to appear under the influence of alcohol, drugs or to be suffering a stroke. Slurred speech may follow with the casualty acting confused, sleepy or irritated, withdrawn or disinterested.

In extreme hypothermia, shivering will stop and the casualty will become unconscious. Breathing will be slow and shallow. This is a critical condition that requires immediate first aid to warm the casualty. Take measures to prevent further heat loss, such as removing wet clothing, covering exposed skin, preventing drafts and insulating the casualty from cold objects. Get medical help immediately.

For more than a century, St. John Ambulance has been helping Canadians learn lifesaving first aid skills. With state-of-the-art equipment and modular courses, there are custom programs designed for all lifestyles. For more information on St. John Ambulance training and high-quality first aid products, contact the branch nearest you or look us up on the web at www.sja.ca.

St. John Ambulance�first in first aid, for you!
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Official Launch of 2004 International Patient Care Competition (IPCC) Website!


The much anticipated 2004 IPCC website is now up and running! Feel free to browse and discover the fun that awaits you in beautiful British Columbia. A lot of the fun of participating in an event such as this is all of the planning and anticipation. On the IPCC website you will find information about accommodation, meal plans, spectator and tourist information, University of British Columbia info, downloadable forms and much more. Check the forms for important deadlines! There is even a media section. Once your team members are selected, why not encourage local media coverage by directing them to the appropriate section of the IPCC site?

Go to www.sja.ca and click on the beautiful 2004 IPCC logo. It will bring you where you need to be. The French text is still under construction, but should be up and running soon. Many thanks go to Adam Zilliax and Dean Lenz from British Columbia! Adam has not only created the site but will act as webmaster for the IPCC site.

Keep checking the 2004 IPCC website for updates. We will be posting digital images of competing teams who choose to forward their photos in advance. You should also be on the lookout for digital images of the many products that will be for sale at the event. Please note that all sales at UBC will be cash only so check out the site and plan ahead!

For those of you in Canada checking out the site, you may want to look up the January 2004 Did You Know when it comes out a little later this month. It will offer helpful hints on sending in photos that can be used in SJA publications and websites.

Executive Worldwide Travel is the �official� travel agent for the competition. You can find their contact information on the site.

For further information, please contact Don Lapierre, Director, Community Services at dlapierre@nhq.sja.ca or by calling 613-236-1283, ext. 263.

Let the games begin!

Don Lapierre
St. John Ambulance Saint-Jean
Director, Community Services/
Directeur, Services communautaires
National Office- Si�ge national

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